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← 2021 Eurovision Song Contest 2022 2023 →

Eurovision 2022 Official Logo.jpg

  • Semi-Final 1: 10 May 2022
  • Semi-Final 2: 12 May 2022
  • Finale: 14 May 2022
  • Venue: PalaOlimpico (Pala Alpitur), Turin, Italy
  • Presenter(s): Alessandro Cattelan, Laura Pausini, Mika
  • Directed by: Cristian Biondani, Duccio Forzano
  • Executive Supervisor: Martin Österdahl
  • Executive Producer: Claudio Fasulo, Simona Martorelli
  • Host Broadcaster: Radiotelevisione italiana (RAI) 
  • Opening Act: Semi-final 1: Performance showcasing Italian ingenuity and creativity; “The Sound of Beauty” performed by Sherol Dos Santos Ι Semi-final 2: “The Italian Way”, ode to Italian hand gestures performed by Alessandro Cattelan Ι Final: “Give Peace a Chance” performed by the Rockin’ 1000; “Benvenuto“, “Io canto“, “La solitudine“, “Le cose che vivi” and “Scatola” performed by Laura Pausini; Flag parade introducing the 25 finalist countries.
  • Interval Act: Semi-final 1: “Horizon in Your Eyes”, “Satisfaction” and “Golden Nights” performed by Dardust, Benny Benassi and Sophie and the Giants; Homage to Raffaella Carrà performed by the presenters; “Fai rumore” performed by Diodato Ι Semi-final 2: “Fragile” and “People Have the Power” performed by Laura Pausini and Mika; “Grande amore” performed by Il Volo Ι Final: “Supermodel” and “If I Can Dream” performed by Måneskin; “Non ho l’età” performed by Gigliola Cinquetti; “Love Today”, “Grace Kelly”, “Yo Yo” and “Happy Ending” performed by Mika
  • Website: eurovision.tv/event/turin-2022
  • Number of entries: 40
  • Debuting countries: None
  • Returning countries: Armenia, Montenegro
  • Non-returning countries: Russia
  • Voting system: Each country awards two sets of 12, 10, 8–1 points to 10 songs: the first–from a professional jury, the second–from viewers.
  • Nul points in Final: None
  • Winning song: Ukraine, KALUSH Orchestra – “Stefania” (Стефанія)
  • Participation map: Y – Participating countries; G – Countries that participated in the past but not in 2022

File:ESC 2022 Map.svg

The Eurovision Song Contest 2022 was the upcoming 66th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Turin, Italy, following the country’s victory at the 2021 contest with the song “Zitti e buoni” by Måneskin. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU-UER) and host broadcaster Radiotelevisione italiana (RAI), the contest will be held at the PalaOlimpico, and consistd of two semi-finals on 10 and 12 May, and a final on 14 May 2022. The three live shows were hosted by Italian television presenter Alessandro Cattelan, singer Laura Pausini and Lebanese-British singer Mika.

This will be the third time that Italy hosts the contest (having previously hosted the 1965 edition in Naples and the 1991 edition in Rome), as well as the first EBU/UER event to be held in the country since the last edition of Jeux sans frontières in 1999.

Forty countries participated in the contest, with Armenia and Montenegro returning after their absences from the previous edition. Russia had originally planned to participate, but was excluded due to its invasion of Ukraine.

The winner was Ukraine with the song “Stefania”, performed by KALUSH Orchestra and written by the group’s members Ihor Didenchuk, Ivan Klimenko, Oleh Psiuk, Tymofii Muzychuk and Vitalii Duzhyk. Ukraine’s 439 points received from the televote in the final are the most televoting points received in the contest’s history to date, thus making “Stefania” the first hip-hop song to ever win the contest. The United Kingdom, Spain, Sweden and Serbia rounded out the top five, with the United Kingdom and Spain achieving their best results since 1998 and 1995 respectively.

1.Location. The 2022 contest took place in Turin, Italy, following the country’s victory at the 2021 edition with the song “Zitti e buoni“, performed by Måneskin. It was the third time that Italy had hosted the contest, having previously done so for the 1965 and 1991 contests, held in Naples and Rome respectively. The selected venue was the 13,300-seat PalaOlimpico, a multi-purpose indoor arena located in the Santa Rita district, which serves as a venue for events including concerts, exhibitions, trade fairs, conferences, and sports (mainly those requiring an ice rink, such as ice hockey and curling). PalaOlimpico had previously hosted the ice hockey events at the 2006 Winter Olympics, and the opening ceremonies of the 2007 Winter Universiade and will host the same event in 2025.

The venue returned to its full capacity for the contest, after the previous edition in Rotterdam saw a limited audience of 3,500 people as a precaution against the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the audience was required to wear masks at all times inside the venue, unlike in Rotterdam where mask-wearing was not enforced whenever the audience was seated.

In addition to the main venue, the host city also organised side events in tandem with the contest. The Eurovision Village was the official Eurovision Song Contest fan and sponsors area during the event weeks, where it was possible to watch performances by contest participants and local artists, as well as the live shows broadcast from the main venue. It was located at Parco del Valentino and open from 7 to 14 May 2022. The EuroClub, which took place across ten different locations in Turin, hosted the official after-parties and private performances by contest participants. Unlike in previous years, access to the EuroClub was not restricted to accredited fans, delegates and press. The “Turquoise Carpet” and Opening Ceremony events, where the contestants and their delegations were presented before the accredited press and fans, took place at the Palace of Venaria on 8 May 2022.

1.1.Bidding phase. Between 23 and 28 May 2021, many cities across Italy expressed interest in hosting the contest. Representatives from the cities of Bologna, Milan, Pesaro, Naples and Turin voiced their interest, as well as the Mayor of Reggio Emilia, Luca Vecchi, who hoped to host the contest in the new RCF Arena, the largest open-air arena in Europe with a capacity of 100,000 spectators. The mayors of Rome, Rimini and Florence soon after also expressed interest in hosting the contest and were joined by Sanremo, Verona and Bari. Marco Di Maio, member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies, also suggested that if Rimini were to host the contest, it should be a co-production with San Marino RTV.

Host broadcaster RAI launched the bidding process on 7 July 2021. In the first phase of this process, any interested cities were to present their bid through certified email by 12 July, after which RAI and the EBU would proceed to send all of them a bid book with more detailed requirements for the cities to submit their plans for review.

On 9 July 2021, the city of Turin officially announced its bid. On the same day, the city of Pesaro did the same, proposing the Vitrifrigo Arena as a possible venue to host the event. They were followed by Bologna and Jesolo on 12 July, and Rimini and Bertinoro (jointly with Forlì and Cesena) on 13 July. On 13 July, RAI announced that 17 cities had submitted their bid for hosting the contest and would be provided the following day with the bid books. They had until 4 August to draft and submit their detailed plans, which 11 cities did. On 24 August, it was reported that Bologna, Milan, Pesaro, Rimini and Turin would be the cities left in the running to host the contest.

The choice among them was meant to be announced by the end of August; however, this did not happen, and in mid-September Stefano Coletta, director of Rai 1, stated that the selection was behind time to ensure “transparency and precision”. On 8 October 2021, the EBU and RAI announced Turin as the host city, with the PalaOlimpico as the chosen venue for the contest.

  • Acireale – PalaTupparello.
  • Alessandria – Cittadella. Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the area; would have needed renovation works.
  • Bertinoro – PalaGalassi. Candidacy supported by Forlì, Cesena and the Legislative Assembly of Emilia-Romagna.
  • Bologna – Fiera di Bologna e Unipol Arena. Candidacy supported by the Legislative Assembly of Emilia-Romagna.
  • Florence – Nelson Mandela Forum. Candidacy supported by the Regional Council of Tuscany.
  • Genoa – Palasport di Genova. Is undergoing renovation works.
  • Jesolo – Palazzo del Turismo. Did not meet the EBU requirements of size; Piave Vecchia Lighthouse area. Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the area.
  • Matera – Cava del Sole. Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the area.
  • Milan – Mediolanum Forum. Did not meet the EBU requirements of size; Palazzo delle Scintille. Would have needed adjustment works. Candidacy supported by the regional government of Lombardy.
  • Palazzolo Acreide – Ad hoc arena to be built. Would have needed the cooperation of other municipalities in Syracuse.
  • Pesaro – Vitrifrigo Arena
  • Rimini – Rimini Fiera. Candidacy supported by the Legislative Assembly of Emilia-Romagna.
  • Rome – PalaLottomatica; Fiera di Roma. Did not meet the EBU requirements of capacity.
  • Sanremo – Mercato dei Fiori.
  • Trieste – PalaTrieste. Did not meet the EBU requirements of size; Stadio Nereo Rocco. Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the stadium.
  • Turin – PalaOlimpico. Candidacy supported by the Turin city council and the Regional Council of Piedmont.
  • Viterbo – Fiera di Viterbo. Did not meet the EBU requirements of size; would have needed renovation works.

2.Production. The Eurovision Song Contest 2022 will be produced by the Italian public broadcaster Radiotelevisione italiana (RAI). The Italian government will allocate around €1.5 million as part of the budget needed to host the event, while the municipality of Turin and the regional government of Piedmont will, in total, contribute to around €10 million. Claudio Fasulo and Simona Martorelli will serve as executive producers. Cristian Biondani and Duccio Forzano will serve as directors of the three live shows, and Claudio Santucci will serve as head of show.

2.1.Visual design. The theme art and slogan for the contest, “The Sound of Beauty”, was unveiled on 21 January 2022, with further information revealed on 24 January. The artwork was built around the symmetrical structure and patterns of cymatics to convey the visual properties of sound, which also reflects Italian garden design, while the typography was inspired by early-20th century Italian poster art; the colours were drawn from those of the Italian flag.

2.2.Presenters. Television presenter Alessandro Cattelan and singers Laura Pausini and Mika are set to host the 2022 edition. They had already been named as likely hosts by Italian news agency Adnkronos and TV magazine TV Sorrisi e Canzoni; and were officially confirmed during the second night of the Sanremo Music Festival 2022 on 2 February, after appearing on that show as special guests. In addition, Gabriele Corsi, Cristiano Malgioglio, Mario Acampa and Laura Carusino will host the “Turquoise Carpet” and Opening Ceremony events.

2.3.Stage design. RAI and the EBU revealed the stage design for the 2022 contest on 18 February 2022. Designed by Rome-based stage designer Francesca Montinaro and dubbed “The Sun Within”, the stage design is based around the movements and light of a kinetic sun, with the ability to showcase theatrical motion. The design also features a working waterfall and a miniaturized recreation of an Italian garden in the green room. Montinaro has previous experience in stage design, having done so for the Sanremo Music Festival in 2013 and 2019. This marked the first time since 2016 that German stage designer Florian Wieder did not design the Eurovision stage.

3.Format.

3.1.Entries. For the second year in a row, delegations have the option to use pre-recorded backing vocals, though each delegation can still use backing singers—whether on or off stage—or a combination of live and recorded backing vocals. However, all lead vocals performing the melody of the song must still be live. The EBU will also require all national broadcasters to create a ‘live-on-tape’ backup recording prior to the contest which can be used if a participant is unable to travel to Turin, or subjected to quarantine on arrival. The 2022 contest will also see a tightening of the rules around song eligibility. Previously, the rules stated that the competing songs must not have been commercially released prior to 1 September of the previous year, now, a song may be ineligible to compete if it has been released to the public in any way, including live performances, before 1 September of the previous year. Enforcement of the rule is subject to the responsibility of the participating broadcasters.

3.2.Semi-final allocation draw. The draw to determine the participating countries’ semi-finals took place on 25 January 2022 at 12:00 CET, at Palazzo Madama. The thirty-six semi-finalists were divided over six pots, based on historical voting patterns as calculated by the contest’s official televoting partner Digame. The purpose of drawing from different pots is to reduce the chance of “bloc voting” and to increase suspense in the semi-finals. The draw also determined which semi-final each of the five automatic qualifiers – “Big Five” countries France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom – will broadcast and vote in. The ceremony was hosted by Carolina Di Domenico and Mario Acampa, with Acampa replacing Gabriele Corsi who tested positive for COVID-19. It included the passing of the host city insignia from Ahmed Aboutaleb, the mayor of previous host city Rotterdam, to Stefano Lo Russo, the mayor of Turin.

  • Pot 1: Albania, Croatia, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia, Slovenia
  • Pot 2: Australia, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden
  • Pot 3: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Israel, Russia[a], Ukraine
  • Pot 4: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece, Malta, Portugal, San Marino
  • Pot 5: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania
  • Pot 6: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Ireland, The Netherlands, Switzerland

3.3.Postcards. The “postcards” are 40-second video introductions shown on television whilst the stage is being prepared for the next contestant to perform their entry. Filming for the 2022 postcards reportedly began on 8 February in Perugia, and is taking place in various sites across Italy, in keeping with the “Sound of Beauty” theme of the contest.  As with the postcards of the previous edition, the participating artists are expected to record their appearances from their own countries for insertion via chroma keying. Reported filming locations have also included:

  • Alba
  • Abbazia di San Galgano (Chiusdino)
  • Breuil-Cervinia (Valtournenche)
  • Burano (Venezia), Veneto
  • Cascata delle Marmore (Terni)
  • Castel del Monte (Andria), Apulia
  • Castel Sismondo (Rimini)
  • Castello di Grinzane Cavour (Cuneo)
  • Castello di Miramare e Piazza Unità d’Italia (Trieste)
  • Centro storico di Perugia (Perugia), Umbria
  • Cinque Terre (La Spezia)
  • Città Alta e Colli di Bergamo
  • Civita (Bagnoregio), Viterbo, Lazio
  • Cortina d’Ampezzo (Belluno), Veneto
  • Giardino di Boboli, Piazza della Signoria e Ponte Vecchio (Firenze)
  • Gole del Sagittario e Lago di Scanno (L’Aquila)
  • Laghi di Fusine (Tarvisio)
  • Lago di Como
  • Mausoleo di Teodorico e Piazza del Popolo (Ravenna), Emilia-Romagna
  • Merano (Bolzano), Trentino-Alto Adige
  • Museo d’arte moderna e contemporanea (Trento e Rovereto), Trentino-Alto Adige
  • Parco regionale del Conero (Ancona), Marche
  • Piazza del Popolo (Ravenna), Emilia-Romagna
  • Porto antico di Genova
  • Procida (Napoli), Campania
  • Reggia di Caserta (Caserta), Campania
  • Rocca Calascio
  • Scala dei Turchi (Realmonte, Agrigento), Sicilia
  • Sulmona
  • Urbino
  • Villa Monastero (Varenna)

4.Participating countries. The EBU initially announced on 20 October 2021 that 41 countries would participate in the 2022 contest. The list included all countries that participated in the 2021 contest, along with Armenia and Montenegro, both of which had last taken part in 2019. On 25 February 2022, the EBU announced that Russia was excluded from participating due to the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, thereby reducing the number of participating countries to 40.

4.1.Returning artists. The contest is set to feature four representatives who previously performed as lead artists for the same countries. Stoyan Yankoulov, a member of Bulgaria’s Intelligent Music Project, represented Bulgaria at the 2007 and 2013 contests alongside Elitsa Todorova. Zdob și Zdub represented Moldova in 2005 and 2011. Mahmood represented Italy in 2019.[99] Ihor Didenchuk, a member of Ukraine’s Kalush Orchestra, represented Ukraine in 2021 as a member of Go_A.

In addition, a former backing performer is set to compete as lead artist. Ihan Haydar, a member of Denmark’s Reddi, represented Denmark in 2012 as a member of Soluna Samay’s backup band.

4.2.Semi-final 1. The first semi-final will take place on 10 May 2022 at 21:00 (CEST). Seventeen countries will participate in the first semi-final. Those countries plus France and Italy will vote in this semi-final. Russia was originally allocated to participate in the second half of the semi-final, but was excluded from the contest due to the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine.

• 1st halft (1-9); 2nd halft: (10-17): Draw – Country – Artist – Song – Language

  1. Albania (RTSH): Ronela Hajati – “Sekret” (Secret) (Ronela Hajati – Ronela Hajati) with Klaudia Pepa, Yusef Zahir, Karmine Verola, Mario Giuseppe Uzzi, Andrea Attila Felice
  2. Lettonia (LTV): Citi Zēni – “Eat your salad” (Ēd Savus Salātus) (Dagnis Roziņš / Jānis Pētersons – Jānis Jačmenkins (JJ Lush) / Roberts Memmēns)
  3. Lituania (LTR): Monika Liu – “Sentimentai” (Sentiments) (Monika Liu – Monika Liu)
  4. Svizzera: Marius Bear – “Boys do cry” (Jungen weinen) (Marius Bear / Martin Gallop – Marius Bear / Martin Gallop)
  5. Slovenia: LPS – “Disko” (Disco) (Filip Vidušin / Gašper Hlupič / Mark Semeja / Zala Velenšek / Žiga Žvižej – Filip Vidušin / Gašper Hlupič / Mark Semeja / Zala Velenšek / Žiga Žvižej)
  6. Ucraina: Kalush Orchestra – “Stefania” (Стефанія) (Ivan Klymenko / Oleh Psiuk – Ihor Didenchuk / Tymofii Muzychuk / Vitalii Duzhyk)
  7.  Bulgaria (BNT): Intelligent Music Project (Интелиджънт Мюзик Проджект) – “Intention” (Намерение) (Milen Vrabevski, MD – Milen Vrabevski, MD)
  8. Paesi Bassi (AVROTROS): S10 – “De diepte” (The depth) (Stien den Hollander / Arno Krabman – Stien den Hollander / Arno Krabman)
  9. Moldavia (TRM): Zdob și Zdub and Frații Advahov – “Trenulețul” (The little train) (Mihail Gincu / Roman Iagupov / Vasile Advahov / Vitalie Advahov – Mihail Gincu / Roman Iagupov / Vasile Advahov / Vitalie Advahov)
  10. Portogallo: MARO – “Saudade, saudade(Longing, longing) (MARO – MARO / John Blanda) with  Beatriz Fonseca, Beatriz Pessoa, Carolina Leite, Diana Castro and Milhanas
  11. Croazia (HRT): Mia Dimšić – “Guilty pleasure” (Grješno zadovoljstvo) (Mia Dimšić / Damir Bačić / Vjekoslav Dimter – Mia Dimšić / Damir Bačić / Vjekoslav Dimter) with 
  12. Danimarca (DR): REDDI – “The show” (Showet) (Ihan Haydar / Siggy Savery / Julia Fabrin – Ihan Haydar / Siggy Savery / Chief 1 / Remee Jackman)
  13. Austria (ÖRF): LUM!X feat. Pia Maria – “Halo” (Heiligenschein) (Luca Michlmayr / Anders Nilsen / Gabriele Ponte / Rasmus Flyckt / Sophie Alexandra Tweed-Simmons – Luca Michlmayr / Anders Nilsen / Gabriele Ponte / Rasmus Flyckt / Sophie Alexandra Tweed-Simmons)
  14. Islanda (RÚV): Systur (Sigga, Beta og Elín) – “Með hækkandi sól” (With the rising sun) (Lovísa Elísabet Sigrúnardóttir – Lovísa Elísabet Sigrúnardóttir)
  15. Grecia (ERT): Amanda Georgiadi Tenfjord (Αμάντα Γεωργιάδη Τένφγιορντ) – “Die together” (Amanda Georgiadi Tenfjord – Amanda Georgiadi Tenfjord / Bjørn Helge Gammelsæter)
  16. Norvegia (NRK): Subwoolfer – “Give that wolf a banana” (Gi den ulven en banan) (Jim / Keith / DJ Astronaut – Jim / Keith / DJ Astronaut)
  17. Armenia (ARMTV/AMPTV): Rosa Linn (Ռոզա Լին) – “Snap” (Rosa Linn / Allie Crystal / Courtney Harrell / Jeremy Dusolet / Larzz Principato / Tamar Mardirossian Kaprelian – Rosa Linn / Allie Crystal / Courtney Harrell / Larzz Principato / Tamar Mardirossian Kaprelian)

4.3.Semi-final 2. The second semi-final will take place on 12 May 2022 at 21:00 (CEST). Eighteen countries will participate in the second semi-final. Those countries plus Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom will vote in this semi-final.

• 1st halft (1-9); 2nd halft (10-18): Draw – Country – Artist – Song – Language

  1. Finlandia (Yle): The Rasmus – “Jezebel” (Lauri Ylönen / Desmond Child – Lauri Ylönen / Desmond Child)
  2. Israele (KAN): Michael Ben David (מיכאל בן דוד) – “I.M” (אני) (Asi Tal / Chen Aharoni / Lidor Saadia – Asi Tal / Chen Aharoni / Lidor Saadia) with  Tomer Tenenbyom, 
  3. Serbia: Konstrakta (Констракта) – “In corpore sano” (У здравом телу, In a healthy body) (Ana Đurić – Ana Đurić / Milovan Bošković)
  4. Azerbaigian (İTV): Nadir Rustamli (Nadir Rüstəmli) – “Fade to Black” (Anderz Wrethov / Andreas Stone / Sebastian Schub / Thomas Stengaard – Anderz Wrethov / Andreas Stone / Sebastian Schub / Thomas Stengaard)
  5. Georgia (GPB): Circus Mircus (ცირკუს მირკუსი) – “Lock me in” (Circus Mircus – Circus Mircus)
  6. Malta (TVM): Emma Muscat – “I Am What I Am” (Emma Muscat / Dino Medanhodzic / Julie Aagaard / Stine Kinck – Emma Muscat / Dino Medanhodzic / Julie Aagaard / Stine Kinck)
  7. San Marino: Achille Lauro – “Stripper” (Lauro De Marinis / Daniele Dezi / Daniele Mungai / Davide Petrella / Federico De Marinis / Francesco Viscovo / Simon Pietro Manzari – Gregorio Calculli (Greg) / Marco Lanciotti (Lancs) / Matteo Ciceroni (Gow Tribe) / Mattia Cutolo (Banf))
  8. Australia (SBS): Sheldon Riley – “Not the same” (Sheldon Riley Hernández – Sheldon Riley Hernández / Cam Nacson)
  9. Cipro (PIK/RIK): Andromache (Ανδρομάχη) – “Ela” (Έλα) (Alex Papaconstantinou / Arash / Eyelar Mirzazadeh / Fatjon Miftaraj / Filloreta Raci Fifi / George Papadopoulos / Robert Uhlmann / Viktor Svensson / Yll Limani – Alex Papaconstantinou / Arash / Eyelar Mirzazadeh / Fatjon Miftaraj / Filloreta Raci Fifi / George Papadopoulos / Robert Uhlmann / Viktor Svensson / Yll Limani) with Nefeli Theodotou & Despina Lagoudaki
  10. Irlanda (RTÉ): Brooke – “That’s rich” (Brooke Scullion / Izzy Warner / Karl Zine – Brooke Scullion / Izzy Warner / Karl Zine)
  11. Macedonia del Nord (MPT): Andrea (Андреа) – “Circles” (Кругови) (Aleksandar Masevski / Andrea – Aleksandar Masevski) with Ana Petanovska and Renata Kralevska (Ана Петановска и Рената Кралевска)
  12. Estonia (ERR): Stefan – “Hope” (Stefan Airapetjan – Stefan Airapetjan / Karl-Ander Reismann)
  13. Romania: WRS – “Llámame” (Sună-mă, Call me) (Andrei Ursu / Cezar Gună – Andrei Ursu / Alexandru Turcu / Cezar Gună / Costel Dominteanu)
  14. Polonia (TVP): Ochman – “River” (Krystian Ochman / Ashley Hicklin – Krystian Ochman / Adam Wiśniewski / Ashley Hicklin / Mikołaj Trybulec)
  15. Montenegro (RTCG): Vladana (Владана) – “Breathe” (Диши) (Vladana – Vladana / Darko Dimitrov)
  16. Belgio (RTBF): Jérémie Makiese – “Miss you” (Jérémie Makiese / Manon Romiti / Mike BGRZ / Silvio Lisbonne – Jérémie Makiese / Manon Romiti / Mike BGRZ / Silvio Lisbonne)
  17. Svezia: Cornelia Jakobs – “Hold Me Closer” (Cornelia Jakobs / David Zandén / Isa Molin – Cornelia Jakobs / David Zandén / Isa Molin)
  18. Repubblica Ceca (ČT): We Are Domi – “Lights off” (Benjamin Rekstad / Dominika Haskova / Abigail Frances Jones – Benjamin Rekstad / Casper Hatlestad / Dominika Haskova / Abigail Frances Jones / Einar Eriksen Kvaløy)

4.4.Final. The final will take place on 14 May 2022 at 21:00 (CEST) Twenty-five countries will participate in the final, composing of the “Big Five” (among which is the host country Italy) and ten of the best-ranked entries in each of the two semi-finals. All forty participating countries will vote in the final.

• Draw – Country – Artist – Song – Language

  • Francia (FT2): Alvan and Ahez – “Fulenn” (Spark) (Marine Lavigne – Alexis Morvan Rosius) 
  • Germania (NDR): Malik Harris – “Rockstars” (Malik Harris / Marianne Kobylka / Robin Karow – Malik Harris / Marianne Kobylka / Robin Karow)
  • 9.Italia (RAI): Mahmood and Blanco – “Brividi” (Shivers) (Blanco / Mahmood / Michelangelo – Blanco / Mahmood / Michelangelo)
  • Spagna: Chanel – “SloMo” (Cámara lenta) (Ibere Fortes / Leroy Sánchez / Maggie Szabo – Arjen Thonen / Ibere Fortes / Keith Harris / Leroy Sánchez / Maggie Szabo) withJosh Huerta, Ria Pérez, Raquel Caurín, Exon Arcos and Pol Soto
  • Regno Unito: Sam Ryder – “SPACE MAN” (Sam Ryder / Amy Wadge / Max Wolfgang – Sam Ryder / Amy Wadge / Max Wolfgang) 

5.Other countries. Eligibility for potential participation in the Eurovision Song Contest requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership that would be able to broadcast the contest via the Eurovision network. The EBU issued an invitation to participate in the contest to all active members. Associate member Australia does not need an invitation for the 2022 contest, as it had previously been granted permission to participate at least until 2023.

5.1.Active EBU members.

  • Andorra – On 1 August 2020, during an interview on Eurovision fansite Wiwibloggs’ podcast, the 2009 Andorran representative Susanne Georgi revealed that she had held a meeting with Prime Minister of Andorra Xavier Espot Zamora, during which they called for the country to make a return in 2022, having not returned for the previous year’s contest due to the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic in Andorra. However, on 19 June 2021, the Andorran broadcaster Ràdio i Televisió d’Andorra (RTVA) stated that the principality would not return in 2022. Andorra last took part in 2009.
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – In June 2021, Bosnian broadcaster Radio and Television of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BHRT) stated that it was unlikely that the country would return to the contest in the upcoming years, unless sufficient funding to do so is secured. On 12 October 2021, BHRT confirmed that Bosnia and Herzegovina would not return in 2022. Bosnia and Herzegovina last took part in 2016.
  • Turkey – In June 2021, it was confirmed by both the EBU and İbrahim Eren, the director general of Turkish national broadcaster Turkish Radio and Television Corporation (TRT), that they were in talks about the country potentially returning to the contest in 2022. However, Turkey did not appear on the final list of participants released by the EBU. Turkey last took part in 2012.

5.2.Non-EBU members.

  • Belarus – On 28 May 2021, the EBU Executive Board agreed to suspend the membership of Belarusian broadcaster BTRC as a result of its use by the Belarusian government as a propaganda tool. The broadcaster was given two weeks to respond before the suspension came into effect, but did not do so publicly. BTRC was expelled from the EBU on 1 July for a period of three years, therefore losing the rights to broadcast and participate in any Eurovision event until 1 July 2024; the broadcaster subsequently released a statement affirming that they would not be supporting Belarus’ participation in upcoming years, including 2022. Belarus last took part in 2019, having intended to compete in the cancelled 2020 contest and having been disqualified from the 2021 contest.
  • Liechtenstein – Liechtensteiner broadcaster 1 FL TV did not debut in the 2022 contest due to the high costs of participation. The broadcaster had attempted to become an EBU member in the past but halted its plans when its director, Peter Kölbel, unexpectedly died. It would also need the backing of the Liechtenstein government to be able to carry the cost of becoming an EBU member and paying the participation fee for the contest.
  • Russia – Despite initially appearing on the list of participants, on 25 February 2022, following the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine and increasing protests from other participating countries, the EBU announced that Russia would be excluded from the 2022 contest. The next day, all EBU members from Russia, including VGTRK and Channel One, announced their withdrawal from the union; however, the EBU itself had yet to receive a confirmation. On 1 March, a further statement from the EBU announced that it had suspended its Russian members from its governance structures. Confirmation of withdrawal from the EBU will cause Russia to lose broadcasting and participation rights for future Eurovision events.

6.Broadcasts. All participating broadcasters may choose to have on-site or remote commentators providing an insight about the show and voting information to their local audience. While they must broadcast at least the semi-final they are voting in and the final, most broadcasters air all three shows with different programming plans. Similarly, some non-participating broadcasters may still want to air the contest. These are the broadcasters that have confirmed in whole or in part their broadcasting plans and/or their commentators:

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries (Country – Show(s) – Broadcaster(s) – Commentator(s)):

  • Albania.
  • Australia. 
  • Belgium.
  • Cyprus.
  • Denmark.
  • France.
  • Germany.
  • Italy.
  • The Netherlands.
  • Poland.
  • Romania. 
  • San Marino.
  • Spain.
  • Switzerland.
  • United Kingdom.

Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries (Country – Show(s) – Broadcaster(s) – Commentator(s)):

  • United States. 

7.Incidents.

7.1.Russo–Ukrainian crisis.

Ukrainian artist replacement. Following the controversy surrounding the Ukrainian national selection in 2019, which led to the country withdrawing from the contest that year, a new rule was introduced starting from 2020 which bars artists who have performed in Russia since 2014 or have entered Crimea “in violation of the legislation of Ukraine” from entering the selection. The 2022 Ukrainian national selection was won by Alina Pash with the song “Tini zabutykh predkiv“. On 14 February 2022, two days after the selection, activist and video blogger Serhii Sternenko alleged that Pash had entered Crimea from Russian territory in 2015, and counterfeited her travel documentation with her team in order to take part in the selection. The Ukrainian broadcaster UA:PBC subsequently stated that they would request the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service to verify if the documentation is forged, and that Pash would not officially be the Ukrainian representative at the contest “until the verification and clarification of the facts is completed”. After it was discovered that a representative of Pash’s team had handed in falsified documentation to UA:PBC, on 16 February, Pash announced on her social media pages that she would withdraw her candidacy as the Ukrainian representative at the contest. Runner-up of the selection, Kalush Orchestra with the song “Stefania”, were offered to represent Ukraine in Pash’s place on 17 February, and a final decision was expected to be made during an extraordinary meeting on 18 February. On 22 February, UA:PBC confirmed that Kalush Orchestra had accepted the offer.

Following the start of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, UA:PBC and Kalush Orchestra had yet to formally comment on whether their participation would continue. On 14 March, Claudio Fasulo and Simona Martorelli, executive producers of the 2022 contest, confirmed that Ukraine would still be competing; this was later reaffirmed by UA:PBC on 19 March via a post on its social media pages. They added that work would commence on the Ukrainian ‘live-on-tape’ backup performance, which is planned to be recorded in Lviv and used in the event that the delegation cannot travel to Turin.

Exclusion of Russia. In the wake of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began on 24 February 2022, UA:PBC appealed to suspend Russian EBU member broadcasters VGTRK and Channel One from the union, and to exclude Russia from competing in the contest. The appeal alleged that since the beginning of the Russian military intervention in Ukraine in 2014, VGTRK and Channel One have been a mouthpiece for the Russian government and a key tool of political propaganda financed from the Russian state budget. The EBU initially stated that Russia as well as Ukraine would still be allowed to participate in the contest, citing the non-political nature of the event.

Several broadcasters expressed their concern at the decision and issued statements calling for the removal of Russia from the contest. In addition to Ukraine’s UA:PBC, nine other countries’ broadcasters requested the EBU to change the decision: Denmark’s DR, Estonia’s ERR, Finland’s Yle, Iceland’s RÚV, Lithuania’s LRT, the Netherlands’ AVROTROS, Norway’s NRK, Poland’s TVP and Sweden’s SVT. Yle also stated that they would withdraw their participation if Russia was not excluded from the contest. This was followed by a similar announcement from ERR. Latvian representatives Citi Zēni also urged the EBU to reconsider Russian participation. On 25 February 2022, the EBU announced that Russia would not compete at the contest, stating that “in light of the unprecedented crisis in Ukraine, the inclusion of a Russian entry in this year’s Contest would bring the competition into disrepute.” The next day, all EBU members from Russia, including VGTRK and Channel One, announced their withdrawal from the union, according to a statement released by Russian state media. Russia had not publicly announced an artist or song before being excluded.

Russia–Ukraine relations in the Eurovision Song Contest

Russia has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest, a pan-European music competition, since 1994, while Ukraine has participated since 2003. Russia and Ukraine have had positive relations, and have exchanged top-3 points with each other several times over the years. Barring a minor dispute over Ukraine’s 2007 entry “Dancing Lasha Tumbai” (whose title was alleged to be a mondegreen of “Russia goodbye”, but was defended by its performer as being meaningless), notable conflicts began to emerge between the two countries at Eurovision in the wake of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

In 2016, Ukraine’s entry was “1944”, a song by Jamala that was inspired by her great-grandmother’s experiences during the deportation of the Crimean Tatars by the Soviet Union. The song was criticised by Russian officials, who argued that it violated Eurovision rules against political content due to its allusions to the Crimean crisis. “1944” would ultimately win the contest. While there were calls for Russia to boycott the Ukraine-hosted 2017 contest over the ongoing conflicts in Eastern Ukraine, Russia did unveil an entrant—Yuliya Samoylova. However, after she was unveiled, it was reported that Samoylova had been banned from entering Ukraine for three years for violating a Ukrainian ban on direct travel to Crimea from Russia. The EBU attempted to reconcile the issues so that Samoylova could perform, calling upon the Ukrainian government to remove or defer her travel ban for the contest, and offering Russia the opportunity to perform their song from a remote venue. However, Russia’s delegate broadcaster, Channel One Russia, passed on the offer, wanting to have Samoylova perform in Kyiv as with all other entrants. On 13 April 2017, Channel One announced that it would not broadcast the contest, effectively withdrawing.

Prior to the 2019 contest in Tel Aviv, Ukraine retracted its entry, Maruv, who had been prominently Russia-based, after she refused to sign the participation contract, causing Ukraine to withdraw from the contest for the first time since 2015.

Ahead of the 2022 contest in Turin, controversy again emerged in the Ukrainian national selection, resulting in its winner Alina Pash replaced by runner-up Kalush Orchestra as the Ukrainian entry.

Following the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine and subsequent protests from other participating countries, Russia was excluded from participating in the contest altogether.

2007 contest. Verka Serduchka was chosen to represent Ukraine at the 2007 contest with the song “Dancing Lasha Tumbai”. However, it was alleged that the song had contained political subtext, including a reference in its lyrics to Maidan (the site of the Orange Revolution demonstrations), and that the phrase “Lasha Tumbai” was a mondegreen of “Russia goodbye”. Serduchka denied these allegations, claiming that the phrase “lasha tumbai” was Mongolian for “churned butter”. On the Russian talk show Пусть говорят (“Let them talk”), which aired on Channel One Russia just after the final of the contest, a native Mongolian speaker explained that the phrase “Lasha Tumbai” does not exist in the Mongolian language. Serduchka later stated that “Lasha Tumbai” was a meaningless phrase meant to rhyme with other lyrics.

2014 and 2015 contests. In the wake of the Russian military intervention in Ukraine and subsequent annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, as well as the introduction of a “gay propaganda” law in Russia in 2013, public opposition to Russia had been markedly visible on multiple fronts, including the Eurovision Song Contest. The Russian entrants at the 2014 and 2015 contests, the Tolmachevy Sisters and Polina Gagarina respectively, were the subject of booing from the audience, in particular at any time they were mentioned or awarded points. Commenting on the booing at the Tolmachevy Sisters, Fraser Nelson, editor of The Spectator magazine, wrote: “I can’t remember the last time I heard a Eurovision audience boo anyone; during the Iraq war in 2003, no one booed Britain. […] There’s a difference between the Russian government and the Russian people, and the girls were there to represent the latter. They didn’t deserve the obloquy. And the Danes were wrong to have made the booing so audible.” The excessive booing in 2014 led the organisers of the 2015 contest to install ‘anti-booing technology’, which was deployed for the first time in the history of the contest.

2016 contest. Jamala, who represented Ukraine at the 2016 contest, won with the song “1944”. The lyrics for her song concern the deportation of the Crimean Tatars, in the 1940s, by the Soviet Union at the hands of Joseph Stalin because of their alleged collaboration with the Nazis. Jamala explained that the lyrics were inspired by the story of her great-grandmother Nazylkhan, who was in her mid-20s when she and her five children were deported to barren Central Asia. One of the daughters did not survive the journey. Eurovision’s official rules state that “no lyrics, speeches, gestures of political or similar nature shall be permitted,” so Jamala repeatedly stated that her song was not referencing the 2014 annexation of Crimea, but her own personal family history. She stated, “I needed that song to free myself, to release the memory of my great-grandmother, the memory of that girl who has no grave.” However, she also referenced the current state of Crimea post-annexation, saying “Of course [the song is] about 2014 as well.” “Now the Crimean Tatars are on occupied territory and it is very hard for them. They are under tremendous pressure. Some have disappeared without a trace. And that is terrifying. I would not want to see history repeat itself.”

Russian officials, including multiple MPs and Maria Zakharova, the spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, were dissatisfied with the outcome and said that the song was a political statement and an allusion on the 2014 annexation of Crimea, forbidden by the rules of the contest. Zakharova wrote in a Facebook post that the next Eurovision winner might as well be about the conflict in Syria, proposing the lyrics: “Assad blood, Assad worst. Give me prize, that we can host.” Other officials suggested boycotting the 2017 contest, with Franz Klintsevich, deputy chairman of the Federation Council Committee on Defense and Security stating, “It was not the Ukrainian singer Jamala and her song ‘1944’ that won Eurovision 2016, it was politics that beat art. If nothing changes in Ukraine by next year, then I don’t think we need to take part.”

Despite this, Russia’s entrant Sergey Lazarev, who placed third in the competition, congratulated Jamala on her win.

2017 contest. The Russian military intervention in Ukraine, which began in late February 2014, prompted a number of governments to apply sanctions against individuals, businesses and officials from Russia. In 2015, the Ukrainian government began to blacklist people who supported the 2014 annexation of Crimea by Russia, from entering the country. Deputy Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kyrylenko stated that the country would not lift this ban for the Eurovision Song Contest 2017. The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) iterated that their goal was for Eurovision to remain inclusive, and that they were “engaging in constructive dialogue with the National Public Broadcasting Company of Ukraine (NTKU) and the Ukrainian authorities to ensure that all delegates and artists can come and stay in Ukraine”. A representative of the host broadcaster told Billboard that the blacklist rules were beyond their control. On 3 March 2017, Russian politician Vitaly Milonov called upon the country to withdraw from the 2017 contest amid fears of the ongoing conflict in Eastern Ukraine. He described Russia as being “unwelcome guests in a country seized by fanatics”.

Russian selection, travel ban. It was reported on 13 March 2017 that Ukraine was investigating Yuliya Samoylova, Russia’s entrant at the 2017 contest, for having violated a ban on direct travel to Crimea from Russia; she had visited Kerch in 2015 to give a performance. Ukrainian officials have speculated that Russia’s choice of Samoylova may have been a deliberate political statement, having knowingly picked a singer who had performed in the disputed territory in order to instigate a political controversy; interior minister adviser Anton Herashchenko stated that he could not “exclude that actions could be taken by our side to deny her entry” if Russia was using the entry as a “provocation”, while the deputy director of ATR, a Ukrainian television broadcaster that serves the Crimean Tatar population, argued that it was a “cynical and immoral move”. Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine Pavlo Klimkin stated that he considers the choice of Samoylova as the Eurovision participant is most likely to be a provocation from Russia. Later the President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko stated the same.[25] Ben Royston, who had advised past Eurovision delegations in Azerbaijan and Sweden, argued that Russia’s choice of a performer with a disability may have also been deliberate, explaining to The Guardian that “[Russia] chose a wheelchair-bound contestant who had made pro-Russian statements about Crimea on social media. She was never going to be allowed in Ukraine, but they chose her anyway. And now Russia are very publicly saying: ‘How can Ukraine let this poor sweet girl in a wheelchair be the victim of your laws?’ It seems clearly all part of the Russia PR machine.” Russia has denied that their choice of performer was meant to be a political statement, and stated that their choice of a performer with a disability was meant to be an expression of diversity.

The Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) confirmed on 22 March 2017 that Samoylova had been banned from entering Ukraine for three years for illegally travelling to Crimea from Russia, thus violating article 204-2 of Code of Ukraine on Administrative Offenses. The EBU responded by stating that it was continuing to ensure that all entrants would be able to perform in Kyiv, but that “we are deeply disappointed in this decision as we feel it goes against both the spirit of the contest and the notion of inclusiveness that lies at the heart of its values”, and also stated that EBU will respect the laws of hosting country. Frants Klintsevich, First Deputy Chairman of the Federation Council Committee on Defence and Security, threatened that Russia would boycott Eurovision unless its organisers declared the government decision to be “unacceptable”. He also accused them of being “completely politicised and biased”.

Attempts to reconcile. The EBU offered a compromise to Channel One Russia on 23 March 2017, in which Samoylova would be allowed to perform remotely from a venue of the broadcaster’s choice; it would have been the first time that a Eurovision entry had been performed from an outside venue via satellite. However, Channel One declined the offer, arguing that Samoylova should be allowed to perform on-stage in Kyiv as with every other entrant, and accusing Ukraine of violating assurances in the Eurovision rules that all performers would be issued the appropriate visas so they could enter the host country. Vice Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kyrylenko had stated that it is illegal for persona non grata to participate in tours or television programmes. Jon Ola Sand, executive supervisor of the contest, stated in an interview with the Danish national broadcaster DR, that he and other members of the European Broadcasting Union had contacted the Ukrainian Security Services about the possibilities of delaying the imposed ban until after the 2017 contest had concluded.

EBU general director Ingrid Deltenre stated that Ukraine’s behaviour was “absolutely unacceptable”, and abused the Eurovision Song Contest ethos for “political action”. Deltenre further went on to say that the EBU were in talks with Ukrainian prime minister Volodymyr Groysman and president Petro Poroshenko, in regards to delaying the ban until after the contest. On 1 April 2017, Deltenre threatened to ban Ukraine from future competitions if Samoylova is not allowed to participate. In response to this, UA:PBC urged the EBU to respect the sovereignty of Ukraine.

Withdrawal. In an interview with German newspaper Der Tagesspiegel published on 26 March 2017, the contest’s Reference Group chairman Frank-Dieter Freiling noted that Russia’s participation in the contest seemed to be unclear, acknowledging that Samoylova had not participated in mandatory previewing sessions prior to the ban, nor had the Russian delegation reserved any accommodations in Kyiv for the contest. He suggested that Russia may have been aware that their selection would be problematic.

On 13 April 2017, Channel One announced that it would not broadcast the 2017 contest. The EBU considered the decision to be an official withdrawal from the contest.

Reactions from other EBU members.

  • San Marino – Carlo Romeo, Director General of the Sanmarinese national broadcaster San Marino RTV (SMRTV), reacted to the decision to ban Samoylova as unacceptable behaviour, that the broadcaster does not care about conspiracy or provocation towards the Russian entrant, and that the song contest is about being on “neutral ground”.
  • Denmark – Jan Lagermand Lundme, Head of Entertainment of the Danish national broadcaster Danmarks Radio (DR), stated in an interview on 25 March 2017 that the 2017 contest has become a “political battleground”, and was fairly satisfied with the work the EBU was carrying out in order to resolve the issue on the ban imposed by Ukraine.
  • Germany – Head of Entertainment for the German broadcaster ARD, Thomas Schreiber, reacted to the situation during an interview with Deutsche Welle. Schreiber stated that the situation between Russia and Ukraine was of a critical nature, and that he felt that both the Russian broadcaster and the Ukrainian authorities were to blame and that the resolution was dependent on the goodwill of both parties.
  • Serbia – Radio Television of Serbia (RTS) stated in 14 April 2017 that they regret the situation and believed that Eurovision should be a place of unity of the nations, and not to divide them. RTS went on to mention about a similar period of difficulty they endured, when they were expelled from the organisation between 1992 and 2004 for political reasons.

2019 contest. Controversy emerged during the Ukrainian national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 regarding contestants’ ties to Russia. During the final of the competition on 23 February 2019, jury members Jamala, Andriy Danylko, and Yevhen Filatov interrogated several contestants regarding their thoughts on Russia, mainly focusing on Maruv and Anna Maria. Jamala asked Maruv on whether Maruv believed Crimea was Ukrainian territory, to which she agreed. Anna Maria were asked, if they had to choose between the two, would they choose their country of Ukraine or their mother, who worked for the Russian-led government of Crimea. During the final, it was announced by the Ukrainian broadcaster, UA:PBC, that the broadcaster had reserved the right to change the decision made by the jury and Ukrainian public.

After Maruv was declared the winner of the selection, it was confirmed she was not yet confirmed as the Ukrainian representative, and discussions would take place between Maruv and the Ukrainian broadcaster. It emerged that Maruv’s representative was sent a contract which she had a 48 hour deadline to sign in order to represent Ukraine. A major feature of the contract was that she must cancel all upcoming performances and appearances in Russia within 24 hours. Maruv later revealed that the broadcaster’s contract had additionally banned her from improvising on stage and communicating with any journalist without the permission of the broadcaster, and required her to fully comply with any requests from the broadcaster. If she were to not follow any of these clauses, she would be fined ₴2 million (~€67,000). Maruv also stated that the broadcaster would not give her any financial compensation for the competition and would not pay for the trip to Tel Aviv.

On 25 February, both Maruv and the broadcaster confirmed that she would not represent Ukraine in Israel due to disputes over the contract, and that another act would be chosen. Viktor Taran, a board member for UA:PBC, later revealed that Maruv refused to cancel her concerts in Russia which led to her refusal to sign the contract. Taran also alleged that Maruv and her lawyers did not believe she was responsible for representing the views of the Ukrainian government while at the Eurovision Song Contest.

National final runner-up Freedom Jazz announced on 26 February that they had rejected the broadcaster’s offer to represent Ukraine as well, with third place finisher Kazka confirming they had also rejected the offer the following day. On 27 February, UA:PBC confirmed that Ukraine would withdraw from the contest following the controversy. In their withdrawal statement, the broadcaster stated that the national selection “has drawn attention to a systemic problem with the music industry in Ukraine – the connection of artists with an aggressor state”.

2022 contest.

Ukrainian artist replacement. Following the controversy surrounding the Ukrainian national selection in 2019, a new rule was introduced starting from 2020 which bars artists who have performed in Russia since 2014 or have entered Crimea “in violation of the legislation of Ukraine” from entering the competition. The Ukrainian national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest 2022 was won by Alina Pash. On 14 February 2022, two days after the selection, activist and video blogger Serhii Sternenko alleged that Pash had entered Crimea from Russian territory in 2015, and counterfeited her travel documentation with her team in order to take part in the selection. The Ukrainian broadcaster UA:PBC subsequently stated that they would request the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service to verify if the documentation is forged, and that Pash would not officially be the Ukrainian representative at the contest “until the verification and clarification of the facts is completed”. Andrii Demchenko, speaking on behalf of the Guard Service, maintained that the certificate Pash had handed in to the broadcaster had not been issued by them, but that a request to cross the border had been made by the artist, and that the broadcaster would be provided with the results of the investigation by 16 February. Pash’s management later stated that she had entered Crimea from the Ukrainian border, and that the certificate had been requested by a “team member” rather than Pash herself. On 16 February, Pash claimed on an Instagram post that the Guard Service had not been able to provide her with a new certificate as proof of her entrance to Crimea, since related records are only kept for five years. Shortly after, Pash announced on her social media pages that she would withdraw her candidacy as the Ukrainian representative at the contest. Runner-up of the selection, Kalush Orchestra, were offered to represent Ukraine in Pash’s place on 17 February, and a final decision was expected to be made during an extraordinary meeting on 18 February. On 22 February, UA:PBC confirmed that Kalush Orchestra had accepted the offer.

Exclusion of Russia: In the wake of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began on 24 February, UA:PBC appealed to suspend Russian EBU member broadcasters VGTRK and Channel One from the union, and to exclude Russia from competing in the contest. The appeal alleged that since the beginning of the Russian military intervention in Ukraine in 2014, VGTRK and Channel One have been a mouthpiece for the Russian government and a key tool of political propaganda financed from the Russian state budget. The EBU initially stated that Russia as well as Ukraine would still be allowed to participate in the contest, citing the non-political nature of the event. The next day, the EBU announced that Russia was excluded from participating in the contest, stating that “in light of the unprecedented crisis in Ukraine, the inclusion of a Russian entry in this year’s Contest would bring the competition into disrepute.”

Before Russia was cut from participating, many participating broadcasters called on the EBU to take action. According to Gustav Lützhøft, editor-in-chief of Dansk Melodi Grand Prix, “we find it incompatible with Eurovision’s values that Russia is participating.” Sweden’s SVT, Iceland’s RÚV, Lithuania’s LRT and Norway’s NRK also called on the EBU to exclude Russia from the contest, while the Netherlands’ AVROTROS, Poland’s TVP and Ukraine’s UA:PBC additionally called on the EBU to suspend Russia’s membership of the union. Estonia’s ERR and Finland’s Yle stated that they would not participate if Russia is invited.

Latvian representatives at the 2022 contest, Citi Zēni, called on the EBU in an email to reconsider Russian participation. They stated: “We love all artists. We love all people. We are united. Eurovision should take action. We urge other delegations & artists to do the same.”

Russia had not publicly announced an artist or song before being excluded.

Voting history. The two nations have exchanged points with each other despite their unstable relations. The tables below show the points awarded between Russia and Ukraine since the latter debuted in the Eurovision Song Contest 2003.

Russia →  Ukraine (SF: – Semi-final, F: – Final, T: – Televote, J: – Jury vote) / (Points – Total – Years):

  • 12 points: 2 (2004(F), 2021(TSF))
  • 10 points: 5 (2006(SF), 2006(F), 2011(F), 2016(TF), 2018(TSF)) 
  • 08 points: 5 (2003(F), 2007(F), 2008(F), 2012(F), 2018(TF))
  • 07 points: 6 (2009(SF), 2010(F), 2013(SF), 2014(SF), 2014(F), 2021(TF)) 
  • 06 points: 1 (2018(JSF))
  • 05 points: 1 (2021(JSF))
  • 04 points: 0 
  • 03 points: 0 
  • 02 points: 2 (2005(F), 2009(F)) 
  • 01 points: 1 (2013(F)) 
  • 00 points:  3 (2016(JF), 2018(JF), 2021(JF))
  • Total: 172 points

Ukraine →  Russia (SF: – Semi-final, F: – Final, T: – Televote, J: – Jury vote):

  • 12 points: 5 (2003(F), 2006(SF), 2006(F), 2008(F), 2016(TF))
  • 10 points: 4 (2004(F), 2007(F), 2010(F), 2012(F))
  • 08 points: 2 ( 2009(F), 2011(F))
  • 07 points: 1 (2013(SF)) 
  • 06 points: 2 (2014(SF), 2021(TSF)) 
  • 05 points: 0
  • 04 points: 4 (2005(F), 2013(F), 2014(F), 2021(TF))
  • 03 points: 1 (2018(TSF))
  • 02 points: 0
  • 01 points: 0 
  • 00 points: 3 (2016(JF), 2018(JSF), 2021(JSF), 2021(JF))
  • Total: 154 points

7.1.1.Ukrainian artist replacement. Following the controversy surrounding the Ukrainian national selection in 2019, which led to the country withdrawing from the contest that year, a new rule was introduced starting from 2020 which bars artists who have performed in Russia since 2014 or have entered Crimea “in violation of the legislation of Ukraine” from entering the selection. The 2022 Ukrainian national selection was won by Alina Pash with the song “Tini zabutykh predkiv“. On 14 February 2022, two days after the selection, activist and video blogger Serhii Sternenko alleged that Pash had entered Crimea from Russian territory in 2015, and counterfeited her travel documentation with her team in order to take part in the selection. The Ukrainian broadcaster UA:PBC subsequently stated that they would request the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service to verify if the documentation is forged, and that Pash would not officially be the Ukrainian representative at the contest “until the verification and clarification of the facts is completed”. After it was discovered that a representative of Pash’s team had handed in falsified documentation to UA:PBC, on 16 February, Pash announced on her social media pages that she would withdraw her candidacy as the Ukrainian representative at the contest. UA:PBC later stated that according to the rules of the selection, they will select another representative among other competing artists in the selection. Runner-up of the selection, Kalush Orchestra with the song “Stefania”, were offered to represent Ukraine on 17 February, and a final decision was expected to be made during an extraordinary meeting on 18 February. On 22 February, UA:PBC confirmed that Kalush Orchestra had agreed to represent Ukraine at the contest.

7.1.2.Russian exclusion. In the wake of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began on 24 February, UA:PBC appealed to suspend Russian EBU member broadcasters VGTRK and Channel One from the union. The appeal alleged that since the beginning of the Russian military intervention in Ukraine in 2014, VGTRK and Channel One have been a mouthpiece for the Russian government and a key tool of political propaganda financed from the Russian state budget. The EBU initially stated that Russia as well as Ukraine would still be allowed to participate in the contest, citing the non-political nature of the event.

Several broadcasters expressed their concern at the decision and issued statements calling for the removal of Russia from the contest. In addition to Ukraine’s UA:PBC, nine other countries’ broadcasters requested the EBU to change the decision: Denmark’s DR, Estonia’s ERR, Finland’s Yle, Iceland’s RÚV, Lithuania’s LRT, the Netherlands’ AVROTROS, Norway’s NRK, Poland’s TVP and Sweden’s SVT. Yle also stated that they would withdraw their participation if Russia was not excluded from the contest. This was followed by a similar announcement from ERR. Latvian representatives Citi Zēni also urged the EBU to reconsider Russian participation. On 25 February 2022, the EBU announced that Russia would not compete at the contest, stating that “in light of the unprecedented crisis in Ukraine, the inclusion of a Russian entry in this year’s Contest would bring the competition into disrepute.” The next day, all EBU members from Russia, including VGTRK and Channel One, announced their withdrawal from the union, according to a statement released by Russian state media. Russia had not publicly announced an artist or song before being excluded.

8.Official album. Eurovision Song Contest: Turin 2022 is the official compilation album of the contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and will be released by Universal Music Group physically on 22 April 2022 on CD and on 6 May 2022 for cassette and vinyl record editions.The album features all 40 entries including the semi-finalists that failed to qualify for the final.

Notes:

  • [a] Russia was excluded from participating a month after the semi-final allocation draw.
  • ^ Contains lines in Spanish.
  • ^ Contains one repeated line in English.
  • ^ Contains two repeated phrases in Spanish, with one being the song’s title.