Partecipanti – Elenco dei paesi nell’Eurovision Song Contest


800px-EurovisionParticipants.svg.png

Participation since 1956: Verde: Entered at least once, Giallo: Never entered, although eligible to do so, Rossa: Entry intended, but later withdrew, Verde Chiaro: Competed as a part of another country, but never as a sovereign country.

Cities_and_Countries_which_Eurovision_held.png

Cities that have hosted the Eurovision Song Contest (as of 2019). The map shows Zagreb in the present day country of Croatia. When the Eurovision was in Zagreb, it was in the former country of Yugoslavia which cannot be shown on the map.

800px-Eurovision_winners_map.svg.png

Map showing each country’s number of Eurovision wins up to and including 2019

Eurovision_participation_map.svg

Map showing debuts in the Contest by decade: Rosso:  1950s   Arancione:  1960s   Giallo:  1970s   Verde:  1980s Blue sky:  1990s Blue:  2000s Viola:  2010s

  • 1: Participated as part of Yugoslavia between 1961 and 1991
  • 2: Participated as part of Yugoslavia and later Serbia & Montenegro until 2005

Fifty-two countries have participated in the Eurovision Song Contest since it started in 1956. Winners of the contest have come from twenty-seven of these countries. The contest, organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), is held annually between members of the Union. Broadcasters from different countries submit songs to the event, and cast votes to determine the most popular in the competition.

Participation in the contest is primarily open to all active member broadcasters of the EBU. To be an active member, broadcasters must be a member of the European Broadcasting Union, or be in a Council of Europe member country. Eligibility to participate is not determined by geographic inclusion within the continent of Europe, despite the “Euro” in “Eurovision”, nor does it have a direct connection with the European Union. Several countries geographically outside the boundaries of Europe have competed: Israel, Cyprus, and Armenia, in Western Asia, since 1973, 1981 and 2006 respectively; Morocco, in North Africa, in the 1980 competition alone; and Australia making a debut in the 2015 contest. In addition, several transcontinental countries with only part of their territory in Europe have competed: Turkey, since 1975; Russia, since 1994; Georgia, since 2007; and Azerbaijan, which made its first appearance in the 2008 edition. Two of the countries that have previously sought to enter the competition, Lebanon and Tunisia, in Western Asia and North Africa respectively, are also outside of Europe. The Persian Gulf state of Qatar, in Western Asia, announced in 2009 its interest in joining the contest in time for the 2011 edition. However, this did not materialise, and there are no known plans for a future Qatari entry the Eurovision Song Contest. Australia, where the contest has been broadcast since the 1970s, has participated every year since making its debut in 2015.

The number of countries participating each year has grown steadily, from seven in 1956 to over twenty in the late 1980s. A record 43 countries participated in 2008, 2011 and 2018. As the number of contestants has risen, preliminary competitions and relegation have been introduced, to ensure that as many countries as possible get the chance to compete. In 1993, a preliminary show, Kvalifikacija za Millstreet (“Qualification for Millstreet”), was held to select three Eastern European countries to compete for the first time at the main Contest. After the 1993 Contest, a relegation rule was introduced; the six lowest-placed countries in the contest would not compete the following year. In 1996, a new system was introduced. Audio tapes of all twenty-nine entrants were submitted to national juries. The twenty-two highest-placed songs after the juries voted reached the contest. Norway, as host country, was given a bye to the final. From 1997 to 2001 a system was used whereby the countries with the lowest average scores over the previous five years were relegated. Countries could not be relegated for more than one year.

Between 2001 and 2003, the relegation system used in 1994 and 1995 was used. In 2004, a semi-final was introduced. The ten highest-placed countries in the previous year’s Contest qualified for the final, along with the “Big Four”: the largest financial contributors to the EBU. All other countries entered the semi-final. Ten countries qualified from the semi, leaving a final of twenty-four. In 2008, two semi-finals were held with all countries, except the host country and the Big Four, participating in one of the semi-finals.

Some countries, such as Germany, France, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, have entered most years, while Morocco has only entered once. Two countries, Tunisia and Lebanon, have attempted to enter the contest but withdrew before making a début. Liechtenstein, a country without an eligible television service, tried unsuccessfully to enter in 1976.

Graph showing the number of participating countries in the Eurovision Song Contest from 1956 to 2019

Graph showing the number of participating countries in the Eurovision Song Contest from 1956 to 2019

The number of countries participating each year has grown steadily, from seven in 1956 to over twenty in the late 1980s and 43 in 2011. As the number of contestants has risen, preliminary competitions and relegation have been introduced, to ensure that as many countries as possible get the chance to compete. In 1993, a preliminary show, Kvalifikacija za Millstreet (“Qualification for Millstreet”), was held to select three Eastern European countries to compete for the first time at the main Contest. After the 1993 Contest, a relegation rule was introduced; the six lowest-placed countries in the contest would not compete the following year. In 1996, a new system was introduced. Audio tapes of all twenty-nine entrants were submitted to national juries. The twenty-two highest-placed songs after the juries voted reached the contest. Norway, as host country, was given a bye to the final. From 1997 to 2001 a system was used whereby the countries with the lowest average scores over the previous five years were relegated. Countries could not be relegated for more than one year.

Between 2001 and 2003, the relegation system used in 1994 and 1995 was used. In 2004, a semi-final was introduced. The ten highest-placed countries in the previous year’s Contest qualified for the final, along with the “Big Four”: the largest financial contributors to the EBU. All other countries entered the semi-final. Ten countries qualified from the semi, leaving a final of twenty-four. In 2008, two semi-finals were held with all countries, except the host country and the Big Four, participating in one of the semi-finals.

Some countries, such as Germany, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, have entered on all but a handful of occasions; Morocco, on the other hand, has only entered once. Two countries, Tunisia and Lebanon, have attempted to enter the contest but withdrew before making a debut. Liechtenstein, a country without an eligible television service, tried unsuccessfully to enter in 1976.

Countries per year: Seven countries participated in the first Contest, in 1956. Since then, the number of entries has increased steadily. In 1970, a Nordic-led boycott of the Contest reduced the number of countries entering to twelve. By the late 1980s, over twenty countries had become standard. In 1993, the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe gave many new countries the opportunity to compete. Three countries—Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, all of them former Yugoslav republics, won through from a pre-qualifier to compete. After the 1993 event, a relegation system was introduced, allowing even more Eastern European countries to compete: seven more made their debut in 1994. In 2003, three countries applied to make their debut: Albania, Belarus and Ukraine. In addition, Serbia and Montenegro, who had not competed since 1992, applied to return. The EBU, having originally accepted the four countries’ applications, later rejected all but Ukraine; allowing four extra countries to compete would have meant relegating too many countries.The semi-final was introduced in 2004 in an attempt to prevent situations like this. The Union set a limit of forty countries, but by 2005 thirty-nine were competing. In 2007, the EBU lifted the limit, allowing forty-two countries to compete. Two semi-finals were held for the first time in 2008.

Lista dei Partecipanti: The following table lists the countries that have participated in the contest at least once. Shading indicates countries that have withdrawn from the contest.

Morocco participated in the contest once, in 1980. Luxembourg, one of the original seven participants, has not been seen at the contest since 1993. Italy withdrew from the contest in 1997 and returned in 2011. Slovakia previously competed three times between 1994 and 1998, failing to break into the top ten, but returned in 2009. Monaco returned to the contest in 2004, after over two decades out of the contest. However, the country failed to advance from the semi-final with each of its first three entries post-return, and withdrew after the 2006 Contest. 

Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro were both dissolved, in 1991 and 2006 respectively. Serbia and Montenegro participated in the 1992 Contest as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia which consisted of only the two republics. Both Montenegro and Serbia have competed as separate countries since 2007.

La seguente tabella elenca i paesi, in ordine alfabetico (internazionale), che hanno partecipato al concorso almeno una volta, con le rispettive reti televisive, il debutto e la loro ultima partecipazione. Ogni paese, inoltre, è dotato del proprio simbolo dell’Eurovision: un cuore, contenente la propria bandiera.

Il paese che detiene il maggior numero di partecipazioni è attualmente la Germania, con 60 presenze sin dall’inizio della manifestazione.

Paese Anno di debutto Ultima partecipazione Nº di Partecipazioni Finali (Miglior risultato FI/SF) Ultima Finale Vittorie Emittente/i
 Albania 2004 2019 16 FI: 5º 2012 (146 punti) SF: 2º 2012 (146 punti) 2019 0 RTSH
 Andorra 2004 2009 6 0 SF: 12º 2007 (80 punti) N/A 0 RTVA
 Armenia 2006 2019 13 10 FI: 4º 2008 (199 punti) SF: 2º 2016 (243 punti) 2017 0 AMPTV/ARMTV
 Australia 2015 2019 5 5 FI: 2º 2016 (511 punti) SF: 1º 2016 (330 punti) 2019 0 SBS
 Austria 1957 2019 52 47 FI: 1º 2014 (290 punti) SF: 1º 2014 (169 punti) 2018 2 ÖRF
 Azerbaigian 2008 2019 12 11 FI: 1º 2011 (221 punti) SF: 1º 2013 (139 punti) 2019 1 İTV
 Bielorussia 2004 2019 16 6 FI: 6º 2007 (145 punti) SF: 4º 2007 (176 punti) 2019 0 BTRC
 Belgio 1956 2019 61 51 FI: 1º 1986 (176 punti) SF: 1º 2010 (167 punti) 2017 1 VRT (olandese)
RTBF (francese) [b]
 Bosnia ed Erzegovina 1993 2016 19 18FI: 3º 2006 (229 punti) SF: 2º 2006 (267 punti) 2012 0 BHRT
 Bulgaria 2005 2018 12 4FI: 2º 2017 (615 punti) SF: 1º 2017 (403 punti) 2018 0 BNT
 Croazia 1993 2019 25 18 FI: 4º 1999 (118 punti) SF: 4º 2005 (169 punti) 2017 0 HRT
 Cipro 1981 2019 36 30 FI: 2º 2018 (436 punti) SF: 2º 2018 (262 punti) 2019 0 CyBC
 Repubblica Ceca 2007 2019 8 FI: 6º 2018 (281 punti) SF: 2º 2019 (242 punti)  2019 0 ČT
 Danimarca 1957 2019 48[c] 44 FI: 1º 2013 (281 punti)  SF: 1º 2013 (167 punti) 2019 3 DR
 Estonia 1994 2019 25[d] 16 FI: 1º 2001 (198 punti) SF: 3º 2009 (115 punti) 2019 1 ERR
 Finlandia 1961 2019 53 45 FI: 1º 2006 (292 punti) SF: 1º 2006 (292 punti) 2018 1 Yle
 Francia 1956 2019 62 62 FI: 1º 1977 (136 punti) 2019 5 RTF (1956–1964)
ORTF (1965–1974)
TF1 (1975–1981)
France Télévisions(1983– ad oggi)
 Georgia 2007 2019 12 7 FI: 9º 2010 (136 punti) SF: 3º 2010 (106 punti) 2016 0 GPB
 Germania 1956 2019 64[c] 63 FI: 1º 2010 (246 punti) 2019 2 HR (1956–1978) (ARD)
BR (1979–1991) (ARD)
MDR (1992–1995) (ARD)
NDR (1996– ad oggi) (ARD)
 Grecia 1974 2019 40 38 FI: 1º 2005 (230 punti) SF: 1º 2008 (156 punti) 2019 1 ERT (1974–2013, 2016–present)
NERIT (2014–2015)
 Ungheria 1994 2019 17[d][c] 14 FI: 4º 1994 (122 punti) SF: 2º 2017 (231 punti)  2018 0 MTVA
 Islanda 1986 2019 32 25 FI: 2º 2009 (218 punti) SF: 1º 2009 (174 punti) 2019 0 RÚV
 Irlanda 1965 2019 53 45 FI: 1º 1994 (226 punti) SF: 6º 2018 (179 punti) 2018 7 RTÉ
 Israele 1973 2019 42[c] 36  FI: 1º 2018 (529 punti)  SF: 1º 2018 (283 punti)  2019 4 IBA (1973–2017)
KAN (2018–ad oggi)[15]
 Italia 1956 2019 45 45 FI: 1º 1990 (149 punti) 2019 2 RAI
 Lettonia 2000 2019 20 10 FI: 1º 2002 (176 punti) SF: 2º 2015 (155 punti) 2016 1 LTV
 Lituania 1994 2019 20 13 FI: 6º 2006 (162 punti) SF: 3º 2012 (104 punti) 2018 0 LRT
 Lussemburgo 1956 1993 37 37 FI: 1º 1983 (142 punti) 1993 5 CLT
 Malta 1971 2019 32 25 FI: 2º 2005 (192 punti) SF: 3º 2016 (209 punti) 2019 0 PBS
 Moldavia 2005 2019 15 10 FI: 3º 2017 (374 punti) SF: 2º 2017 (291 punti) 2018 0 TRM
 Monaco 1959 2006 24 21  FI: 1º 1971 (128 punti) SF: 19º 2004 (10 punti) 1979 1 TMC
 Montenegro 2007 2019 11 FI: 13º 2015 (44 punti) SF: 7º 2014 (63 punti) 2015 0 RTCG
 Marocco 1980 1980 1 1 FI: 18º 1980 (7 punti) 1980 0 SNRT
 Paesi Bassi 1956 2019 60 51 FI: 1º 2019 (498 punti)[2]SF: 1º 2019 (231 punti) 2019 5 NTS (1956–1969)
NOS (1970–2009)
TROS (2010–2013)
AVROTROS (2014–ad oggi)
 Macedonia del Nord [e] 1998 2019 19[c] 9 FI: 7º 2019 (303 punti)[1] SF: 2º 2019 (239 punti) 2019 0 MKRTV
 Norvegia 1960 2019 58 55 FI: 1º 2009 (387 punti) SF: 1º 2018 (266 punti) 2019 3 NRK
 Polonia 1994 2019 22 14 FI: 2º 1994 (166 punti) SF: 6º 2016 (151 punti) 2017 0 TVP
 Portogallo 1964 2019 51 42 FI: 1º 2017 (758 punti) SF: 1º 2017 (370 punti) 2018 1 RTP
 Romania 1994 2019 20[d][c] 18 FI: 3º 2010 (162 punti) SF: 1º 2005 (235 punti) 2017 0 TVR
 Russia 1994 2019 22[c] 21 FI: 1º 2008 (272 punti) SF: 1º 2016 (342 punti) 2019 1 RTR (1994, 1996, 2008–present)
C1R (1995–ad oggi)[f]
 San Marino 2008 2019 10 FI: 19º 2019 (77 punti)[3] SF: 8º 2019 (150 punti) 2019 0 SMRTV
 Serbia 2007 2019 12 FI: 1º 2007 (268 punti) SF: 1º 2007 (298 punti) 2019 1 RTS
 Serbia e Montenegro 2004 2005 2 2 2005 0 UJRT
 Slovacchia 1994 2012 7[d] 3 FI: 18º 1996 (19 punti) SF: 13º 2011 (48 punti) 1998 0 STV (1994–2010)
RTVS (2011–2012)
 Slovenia 1993 2019 25 15 FI: 7º 1995 (84 punti) SF: 3º 2011 (112 punti)  2019 0 RTV SLO
 Spagna 1961 2019 59 59 FI: 1º 1968[4] (29 punti) 2019 2 TVE
 Svezia 1958 2019 59 58 FI: 1º 2012 (372 punti) SF: 1º 2015 (217 punti) 2019 6 Sveriges Radiotjänst (1958)
SR (1959–1979)
SVT (1980–ad oggi)
  Svizzera 1956 2019 60 49 FI: 1º 1988 (137 punti) SF: 4º 2019 (232 punti) 2019 2 SRG SSR
 Turchia 1975 2012 34 33 FI: 1º 2003 (167 punti) SF: 1º 2010 (118 punti) 2012 1 TRT
 Ucraina 2003 2018 15 15 FI: 1º 2016 (534 punti) SF: 1º 2008 (152 punti) 2018 2 UA:PBC
 Regno Unito 1957 2019 62 62 FI: 1º 1997 (227 punti)  2019 5 BBC
 Jugoslavia[g] 1961 1992 27 27 1992 1 JRT

Notes: Table key: In Grey Withdrawn – Countries who have participated in the past but have withdrawn. In Red Former – Former countries that have been dissolved.

  • a Correct as of the 2019 contest.
  • b VRT and RTBF alternate responsibilities for the contest.
  • c Did not qualify from the non-televised audio-only preselection round of 1996.
  • d Did not qualify from the preselection round of 1993.
  • e Until 2018 participated as F.Y.R. Macedonia.
  • f RTR and C1R alternate responsibilities for the contest since 2008.
  • g The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia competed as “Yugoslavia” in 1992.

Note:

  • [1] A causa di un errore umano, causato nella votazione finale del 2019 dalla giuria bielorussa, da 8°, il paese è passato al 7° posto.
  • [2] A causa di un errore umano, causato nella votazione finale del 2019 dalla giuria bielorussa, da 492 punti totalizzati inizialmente, il paese è passato ad un totale di 498 punti.
  • [3] A causa di un errore umano, causato nella votazione finale del 2019 dalla giuria bielorussa, da 20°, il paese è passato al 19° posto.
  • [4] Ha vinto come Spagna franchista.

I Big Five: Cinque tra le nazioni partecipanti vengono definite Big Five. Queste cinque nazioni hanno supportato e tuttora supportano maggiormente l’Unione europea di radiodiffusione (UER). Sostanzialmente questi paesi hanno il diritto di accedere direttamente alla serata finale, senza che competano nelle semifinali, tuttavia possono votare a turno in una di esse. Essi sono: Francia Francia (dal 2000), Germania Germania (dal 2000), Italia Italia (dal 2011), Spagna Spagna (dal 2000), Regno Unito Regno Unito (dal 2000).

In blu i "Big five": Francia, Germania, Italia, Regno Unito e Spagna

In blu i “Big five”: Francia, Germania, Italia, Regno Unito e Spagna

Con il termine Big Five vengono indicate le cinque nazioni che hanno per prime sostenuto economicamente l’Unione europea di radiodiffusione e che tuttora la supportano maggiormente. I primi tre hanno fondato la manifestazione canora internazionale più longeva al mondo: l’Eurovision Song Contest.

Questi paesi sono:

  • Francia Francia;
  • Germania Germania;
  • Italia Italia;
  • Regno Unito Regno Unito;
  • Spagna Spagna.

Per questo motivo, essi hanno accesso diretto alla serata finale dell’Eurovision Song Contest. Precedentemente (prima del 2011) il gruppo era formato solo da quattro paesi, ed era pertanto chiamato Big four, dal momento che l’Italia si era ritirata dalla manifestazione nel 1997 e per tale motivo conta il minor numero di partecipazioni.

L’esistenza di questo gruppo ha causato note di disaccordo di alcuni paesi: dal 2013, per esempio, la Turchia ha deciso di non partecipare alla competizione, criticando il fatto che questi paesi, per accedere alla finale, non debbano passare per le semifinali come tutti gli altri partecipanti.

Vittorie nell’Eurovision: Il primo vincitore dei Big five fu André Claveau nel 1958 (il primo vincitore maschio della manifestazione), rappresentante della Francia, che vincerà poi l’Eurovision altre 4 volte. Come il Regno Unito è anche il paese con più vittorie per i Big five(ben 5 vittorie). Seguono poi la Spagna, l’Italia e la Germania con sole due vittorie.

L’ultima vittoria di un membro dei grandi cinque risale, invece, al 2010, dove in Norvegia la cantante tedesca Lena trionfò con la canzone “Satellite”. Tutti, infine, ricordano l’edizione del 1969 a Madrid, quando ben 4 paesi (tra cui proprio 3 membri dei Big five (Francia, Spagna e Regno Unito) vinsero con lo stupore del pubblico (il quarto era l’Olanda).

Albo d’oro:

Tabella riassuntiva delle vittorie dei “Big”
Anno Paese Cantante Canzone Punti Secondo posto Data Sede
1958 Francia Francia André Claveau Dors, mon amour 27 Svizzera Svizzera 12 marzo 1958 Paesi Bassi Paesi Bassi, 

Hilversum

1960 Francia Francia Jacqueline Boyer Tom Pillibi 32 Regno Unito Regno Unito 25 marzo 1960 Regno Unito Regno Unito, 

Londra

1962 Francia Francia Isabelle Aubret Un premier amour 26 Monaco Principato di Monaco 18 marzo 1962 Lussemburgo Lussemburgo, 

Lussemburgo

1964 Italia Italia Gigliola Cinquetti Non ho l’età 49 Regno Unito Regno Unito 21 marzo 1964 Danimarca Danimarca, 

Copenaghen

1967 Regno Unito Regno Unito Sandie Shaw Puppet on a String 47 Irlanda Irlanda 8 aprile 1967 Austria Austria, 

Vienna

1968 Spagna Spagna Massiel La, la, la 29 Regno Unito Regno Unito 6 aprile 1968 Regno Unito Regno Unito, 

Londra

1969 Francia Francia Frida Boccara Un jour, un enfant 18 nessun secondo posto
4 vincitori
29 marzo 1969 Spagna Spagna, 

Madrid

Regno Unito Regno Unito Lulu Boom Bang-a-bang
Spagna Spagna Salomé Vivo cantando
1976 Regno Unito Regno Unito Brotherhood of Man Save Your Kisses for Me 164 Francia Francia 3 aprile 1976 Paesi Bassi Paesi Bassi, 

L’Aia

1977 Francia Francia Marie Myriam L’oiseau et l’enfant 136 Regno Unito Regno Unito 7 maggio 1977 Regno Unito Regno Unito, 

Londra

1981 Regno Unito Regno Unito Bucks Fizz Making Your Mind Up 136 Germania Ovest Germania Ovest 4 aprile 1981 Irlanda Irlanda, 

Dublino

1982 Germania OvestGermania Ovest Nicole Ein bißchen Frieden 161 Israele Israele 24 aprile 1982 Regno Unito Regno Unito, 

Harrogate

1990 Italia Italia Toto Cutugno Insieme: 1992 149 Francia Francia
Irlanda Irlanda
5 maggio 1990 Jugoslavia Jugoslavia, 

Zagabria

1997 Regno Unito Regno Unito Katrina & The Waves Love Shine a Light 227 Irlanda Irlanda 3 maggio 1997 Irlanda Irlanda, 

Dublíno

2010 Germania Germania Lena Satellite 246 Turchia Turchia 29 maggio 2010 Norvegia Norvegia, 

Oslo

Albo d’oro per nazione:

Paese Primo posto Anni Secondo posto Anni Terzo posto Anni
EuroReino Unido.svg Regno Unito 5 1967-1969-1976-1981-1997 15 1959-1960-1961-1964-1965
1968-1970-1972-1975-1977
1988-1989-1992-1993-1998
3 1973-1980-2002
EuroFrancia.svg Francia 5 1958-1960-1962-1969-1977 4 1957-1976-1990-1991 7 1959-1965-1967-1968-1978
1979-1981
EuroAlemania.svgGermania 2 1982-2010 4 1980-1981-1985-1987 5 1970-1971-1972-1994-1999
EuroEspaña.svg Spagna 2 1968-1969 4 1971-1973-1979-1995 1 1984
EuroItalia.svg Italia 2 1964-1990 3 1974-2011-2019 5 1958-1963-1975-1987-2015

Posizione dall’anno di debutto come membri dei “Big Five”:

Edizione Big Five
FranciaFrancia Punti GermaniaGermania Punti ItaliaItalia Punti SpagnaSpagna Punti Regno Unito Regno Unito Punti
Svezia Stoccolma 2000 23º 5 96 Nessuna partecipazione 18º 18 16º 28
Danimarca Copenaghen 2001 142 66 76 15º 28
Estonia Tallinn 2002 104 21º 17 81 [1] 111
Lettonia Riga 2003 18º 19 11º 53 81 26º 0
Turchia Istanbul 2004 15º 40 93 10º 87 16º 29
Ucraina Kiev 2005 23º 11 24º 4 21º 28 22º 18
Grecia Atene 2006 22º 5 15º 36 21º 18 19º 25
Finlandia Helsinki 2007 22º 19 19º 49 20º 43 23º 19
Serbia Belgrado 2008 19º 47 23º 14 16º 55 25º 14
Russia Mosca 2009 107 20º 35 24º 23 173
Norvegia Oslo 2010 12º 82 246 15º 68 25º 10
Germania Düsseldorf 2011 15º 82 10º 107 189 23º 50 11º 100
Azerbaigian Baku 2012 22º 21 110 101 10º 97 25º 12
Svezia Malmö 2013 23º 14 21º 18 126 25º 8 19º 23
Danimarca Copenaghen 2014 26º 2 18º 39 21º 33 [2] 74 17º 40
Austria Vienna 2015 25º 4 26º[3] 0 292 21º 15 24º 5
Nuovo sistema di votazione (cambio rispetto alle regole dal 1975 al 2015)
Svezia Stoccolma 2016 257 26º 11 16º 124 22º 77 24º 62
Ucraina Kiev 2017 12º 135 25º 6 334 26º 5 15º 111
Portogallo Lisbona 2018 13º 173 340 308 23º 61 24º 48
Israele Tel Aviv 2019 16º 105 25º 24 472 22º 54 26º 11

Legenda:

  • Giallo, Il paese ha vinto il contest
  • Griggio, Il paese si è piazzato al secondo posto
  • Marrone, Il paese si è piazzato al terzo posto
  •  Rosso, Il paese si è piazzato all’ultimo posto

Curiosità:

  • Francia Francia:
    • è il membro dei Big di maggior successo nei primi 10 anni di concorso (3 vittorie, 1 secondo posto, 2 terzi posti, 2 quarti posti e 1 quinto posto (9 top 10)).
    • detiene il maggior numero di terzi posti e quarti posti in assoluto tra i paesi partecipanti (7 terzi posti e 7 quarti posti).
  • Germania Germania:
    • è l’unica tra i Big Five ad essere stata eliminata in una preselezione, precisamente in quella del 1996, l’unica occasione che ha impedito al paese che conta più partecipazioni in assoluto (63 al 2019) di partecipare a tutte le edizioni;
    • ha partecipato come Germania Ovest Germania Ovest, divisa dalla Repubblica Democratica Tedesca come paese indipendente, fino alla riunificazione con essa solo nel 1989. La prima partecipazione come unico paese risale al 1990.
    • Dall’istituzione dei Big, è l’unica ad essere riuscita a vincere.
  • Italia Italia:
    • è il membro dei Big Five a contare il minor numero di partecipazioni all’attivo (45 al 2019);
    • è l’unico membro a non aver partecipato negli anni 2000;
    • detiene il maggior numero di punti ricevuti come membro dei Big con entrambi i sistemi di voto, 292 nell’edizione 2015 e 472 nell’edizione 2019.
    • ha ispirato la creazione dell’ESC con il Festival di Sanremo;
    • è l’unico paese ad aver vinto in una nazione non più esistente (Eurovision Song Contest 1990 in Jugoslavia).
    • dall’istituzione dei Big, è l’unico membro a non essersi mai piazzato all’ultimo posto, nonché a non essere mai risultato il peggior Big in gara.
  • Regno Unito Regno Unito:
    • è il paese che ha più volte ospitato l’ESC (ben otto volte);
    • detiene il maggior numero di secondi posti (ben 15).
  • Spagna Spagna:
    • ha partecipato prima come Spagna franchista dal 1961 al 1975, poi come Stato Spagnolo dal 1977 al 1981;
    • è l’unico membro dei Big Five ad aver vinto due edizioni consecutive (1968-1969).

Note:

  • [1] Nel 2002 il Regno Unito si è piazzato al terzo posto con l’Estonia Estonia.
  • [2] Nel 2014 la Spagna si è piazzata al nono posto con la Danimarca Danimarca.
  • [3] Nel 2015 la Germania si è piazzata all’ultimo posto con l’Austria Austria.

Rispondi

Effettua il login con uno di questi metodi per inviare il tuo commento:

Logo di WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Google photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Connessione a %s...